Tuesday
Jul182017

George Washington's Mount Vernon

George Washington was a personal hero for me. I grew up not far from Valley Forge Park. My parents took my brother and I there when I was about five years old and we saw the log cabins, headquarters, and frothy white dogwood trees. When I was in High School, I performed the Ballad of Valley Forge in 1976 on a well maintained lawn within the Park with the Pottstown Symphony. As I looked out from my spot on stage while holding my viola, I wondered what it might have been like during Washington’s time.

Later, I learned, George Washington led a rag tag group of men on retreat from the Battle of Brandywine, right through the very neighborhood where I grew up and reconnoitered at the Antes Farm in New Hanover, Pennsylvania.

I was thrilled by Washington’s heroic crossing of the Delaware and his defeat of the British at Trenton. Later, as an antiques dealer, I was intrigued by his relationship with Richard Stockton and poet wife Annis Boudinot, the owners of Morven in Princeton, New Jersey. This was due to a painting of their son Richard Stockton which I had on consignment. I also bought and sold through Noonmark Antiques a painting of the Hasbrouck House, Washington’s headquarters at Newburgh, New York.

To me, George Washington belonged to our region – the Philadelphia, Valley Forge, Trenton areas. But, I knew, he had a home in Virginia and I decided it was time for me to see where his heart belonged.

Before we made the trip to Mount Vernon, I looked up the Mount Vernon website. Spoiler alert. You can see a virtual tour of the entire interior of the house. It really is quite helpful especially since I later learned, no photography permitted within the house and we spent less than five minutes in each room. MountVernon.org/virtualtour

The virtual tour helped prepare me for the bold colors in some of the rooms. Washington’s favorite color was green and the brilliant verdigris dining room took my breath away. Another room is painted bright robin’s egg blue. These colors were the actual original colors of the rooms. Bright colors were a sign of wealth. Since Washington was a wealthy farmer and he actually owned five farms, his color choices are understandable.

Photographs of post cards by Hal Conroy

The tours at Mount Vernon are well organized. Visitors are assigned a tour time. There are kind helpful guides with cheery attitudes in spite of the heat and humidity to direct you to your destination. Each room had its own docent and although brief, the presentations were succinct and knowledgeable. There is an opportunity mid tour to stand on the back porch and gaze at the mighty Potomac River. Mount Vernon is perfectly situated to gain the best vantage point. After the tour, there was a choice- wander the grounds or join more tours. We chose to wander separately. I walked down the terraced steps to the wharf and enjoyed the cool breeze off the Potomac.

Then, I made my way to the Washington burial site, the inspiration for many early needlework samplers.

If you go, wear comfortable shoes and bring drinking water. There is a lot of walking. I did 13,000 steps that day. Children ages 5 and over may enjoy this trip. Children under 5 may get tired of the walk and strollers are not permitted in the mansion tour. There were many visitors even on a very hot day in 90 + temperatures. I would return in the Spring and allow 2 days for my visit next time. There is a muesum, 6-8 theatres that show related films, a distillery and grist mill, and the grounds themselves which include gardens, beside the mansion tour.

Found this fellow as I descended the stairs to the wharf.

A painting of Mount Vernon at the Whitney Muesum in NYC, by Herman Trunk, Jr. 1932.

 

 

 

 

Monday
Jul032017

The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Part 2

I had a few free hours so I took a quick subway ride to the Met. This time, my plan was to try to see every room in the American Wing. Ha! I did not get very far. I spent too much time reading the description cards, which are really interesting. Most folks fly through the rooms but I want to learn while I am there, so I take my time. When I was a child and teeneager, I loved opulent things. Our High School American Culture Seminar took a trip to Boston back in 1975 and I was intrigued by the beautiful items in the various house museums. I would have loved  the trip I took to the Met this time. Here is a sample of the beauty:

Grecian Sofa, American Wing circa 1820-1825

Look at these legs! Imagine having this incredible sofa in your living room!

Lannuier Sideboard, American Wing, circa 1812-1819

Always good to examine a piece by Lannuier up close and personal.

Herter Brothers Arm Chair, American Wing, 1875

This stunning chair needs to be seen in person. An identical pair of chairs were placed in the White House during Ulysses S. Grant's term in 1875.

Severin Roesen, "Still Life of Fruit" circa 1855, American Wing

Astonishing display of fruit available in America during this time. Always good to study Roesen's style,technique, and breathtaking lovliness.

 

 

 

Saturday
Jun242017

The Metropolitan Museum of Art , Part 1

Well, Noonmark Antiques became a member of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. It made sense. Requested donations at the door are $25. a person ( although, you may pay anything you like, really!!! so there's no reason not to go!) I paid $50. for my daughter and I on Monday, and after a few days I  decided, "Why not become a member?" For a $100. membership, you get all kinds of benefits. You can bring a guest for free and get discounts in the restauarants and gift shops. Well alrighty then!

I went specifically on Thursday to become a member and then, with my newly gained sense of belonging, I decided to just wander around in rooms I had never seen instead of making a bee line for the Americana Wing and visible storage area, like I always do. Below are a few examples of remarkable objects and rooms within the Met Museum.

Tin Glazed Instand of Apollo and the Muses, 1584

Tin Glazed Inkstand of a Madman Distilling His Brains, c. 1600

Sampling of a Period Room

Remarkable marble console table. There were a pair.

Drop Front Desk ,circa 1787, attirbuted to no less than six artisans including Wedgwood and Sevres.

to be continued........

 

 

 

 

Thursday
Jun152017

Fine Printed Books & Manuscripts Including Americana Sale at Christies June 15, 2017, Auction Highlights

This was a treat for any ephemera enthusiast. I am glad I have the catalogue so that I can go back at my leisure and read through the offerings. Below are a few of special interest to me.

Lot 241 A 1777 broadside giving an account  of George Washington and his troops crossing the Delaware River and the ensuing battle in Trenton. The illustrated woodcut of a Continental soldier is quite thrilling. Estimate $40,000. -$60,000. Sold for $140,000.

Lot #275 The Earliest Obtainable Full Printing of The Star Spangled Banner in the Daily Federal Republican, Georgetown, September 1814. Somehow, I thought I had a shot at this. The Star Spangled Banner is dear to my heart. I wrote my High School term paper on this topic. It was my first research project. Hope springs eternal. I thought , possibly, this might pass under the radar. Oh no. It started at $2,000. and increment by increment ( which took about 15 minutes in hushed silence) ended at $135,000.Well done!

Lot #413 Coffee Anyone? A complete copy of the first herbal written and published in America by Johann Christoph Sauer Germantown, PA. The coffee page was posted in 1770. Folks cared about their coffee as much then as they do now. Estimate $6,000. -$9,000. Sold for $7,500.

 

Lot # 366 How to pickle barberries from The First Known Published Cookbook in America 1796. After reading this description, it hardly seems worth the trouble, don't you think? Estimate $5,000-$8,000.

Lot # 330 The Signature of Button Gwinnett, the Rarest of the Signers of the Declaration of Independence. Gwinnett emigrated to America and as a merchant, eventually settled in Georgia. He became interested in the movement toward independence, attended a meeting, and was named to the Continental Congress. He was present for the vote and signed the Declaration of Independence.Estimate $100,000. - $150,000. Sold $319,500.

Lot # 432 See above for description. Sold for $607,500.

 

 

Thursday
Jun152017

The Metropolitan Opera Guild Collection at Christie's, NYC June 15, 2017

Below are some highlights from the auction of items from the Metropolitan Opera Guild Collection at Christie's, NYC on June 15, 2017. I did not win Stravinsky's gold writing instrument ($1500.) though I did bid.

I heard through the grapevine that these were the last of the items available through the Guild. They were sold to raise money for the opera. Check out the catalogue. There were some amazing items sold today.

Lot # 51 A letter from Wolfgang Mozart to his father Leopold, explaining why he has not come to visit because of his very full performance schedule. The letter includes a list of concert dates and locations. Estimate $200,000.-$300,000. Sold for $260,000.

Lot #66 Franz Schubert Piano Sonata in A flat Major. Eight pages of manuscript and autographed by the composer. Estimate $350,000- $500,000. Sold for $390,000.

Lot #85 1 page manuscript of an ending to "Das Rheingold" one of the earliest bits of musical material introducing the public to "The Ring Cycle." Gives me goosebumps just to think....

Estimate $30,000. -$50,000. Sold for $75,000.

Afterwards, I happened upon our Auctioneer as she was being photographed for publicity. I told her that she is now my new favorite Auctioneer. She is friendly, interesting, bothered to know a bit about what she was offering, beguiling, and made personal contact with Internet bidders. She created a sense of in the moment reality with bidders from around the world right there in the room with us. In a word, Delightful. I failed to catch her name but when I find out, I will post it here.